Apologetics Summer Series

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The summer series on Apologetics is a wrap! I enjoyed putting together this adult class and am really happy with how it all turned out. Overall, I hope it was a great resource for people, and ultimately, helped those who attended have a greater understanding of the scriptures and their calling to be a part of God’s plan for reaching the world. The audio and powerpoint/handouts are all available for those who want to revisit the series, or dive into weeks they missed:

Here is the outline for the ten weeks:

  • July 1: Introduction to Apologetics, Dr. David Lamb
  • July 8: Existence of God, Dr. David Lamb
  • July 15: The Problem of Evil, Dr. Bo Matthews
  • July 22: Reliability of Scripture, Dr. Marilyn Button
  • July 29: The Resurrection, Dr. Bo Matthews
  • Aug 5: Postmodernism and Culture, Dr. David Hard
  • Aug 12: Postmodernism & Defending the Faith, Dr. David Hard
  • Aug 19: Journalism: A Search for Truth, Dick Lawyer
  • Aug 26: Journalism: Connecting the Dots, Dick Lawyer
  • Sept 2: World Religions, Rev. Matthew McNutt

I’m Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness

still hereI’m Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness, by Austin Channing Brown, is a powerful book. From her opening sentence to the close of the book, Brown writes a provocative, challenging call to not just awareness, but action. She shines the light not just on the blatant ways in which American culture reveals its racism; she also highlights the more subtle, insidious racism that often times goes unnoticed by those exhibiting it.

“White supremacy is a tradition that must be named and a religion that must be renounced. When this work has not been done, those who live in whiteness become oppressive, whether intentional or not.” (p.22)

For me, this book is a call to action for the church. If we’re really honest with ourselves, “white churches” largely ignore this topic, or periodically give it token acknowledgement, but for the most part ignore it because it’s easy. And it’s uncomfortable to actually acknowledge.

I loved her story of a fellow classmate beginning to get it;

“‘I don’t know what to do with what I’ve learned,’ she said. ‘I can’t fix your pain, and I can’t take it away, but I can see it. And I can work for the rest of my life to make sure your children don’t have to experience the pain of racism.’ And then she said nine words that I’ve never forgotten: ‘Doing nothing is no longer an option for me.'” (p.58)

I’ll be honest, it’s hard to capture the book in a short blog post. It’s powerful. It’s important. Christians need to read it, but not just pat themselves on the back for reading it – it needs to provoke change, not just awareness. The challenge of doing nothing no longer being an option rings loud and clear through every page.

The Lost World of Scripture: Ancient Literary Culture and Biblical Authority

lost worldThe third book in John Walton’s “Lost World” series, this is the first to feature a co-author, and the biggest of the five. The Lost World of Scripture is heavy reading, but fascinating. Walton and Sandy follow the format of previous books with building propositions, but this time with regard to ancient views on communication, authority, and literature. Essentially, Walton writes the first half of the book with a focus on Old Testament literature, while Sandy does the same with the New Testament. The book then concludes with a few more propositions written by them together.

Walton’s contribution was riveting; I was fascinated with his exploration of ancient authority, oral based cultures, and the minor role the written word played – which makes sense, given how few were actually literate. In some ways, it became abundantly clear that as a text-dominant culture and world, it is almost impossible to fully understand ancient culture’s oral based system of authority and passing on of information. Walton does an effective job of identifying those cultural differences and how it has both shaped the scriptures, as well as ways in which we should reconsider our approaches to scripture today.

Sandy’s New Testament portion was also interesting, however somewhat redundant. Literacy was becoming more wide spread during the writing of the New Testament books, but it was still a primarily oral based culture so there was a lot of overlap in what he wrote with what Walton had already established in the Old Testament portion of the book.

In the conclusion, the authors tackle issues of inerrancy, modern standards versus ancient standards, and a present a compelling argument for the authority of scripture. Overall, I’m really glad I read the book. I feel like I have a much stronger sense of scripture and authority. At the same time, it was not an easy read. It took me a while to work my way through the whole book; I’m not sure that it’s ideal for the casual reader. You really need to want to understand ancient languages and literature, as well as ancient views on authority and values in writing to enjoy this book. Having said that, it’s definitely an important work for anyone who teaches/preaches from scripture to read.

Becoming a Welcoming Church

BecomingAWelcomingChurch“Becoming a Welcoming Church,” by Thom Rainer, is a must read for anyone in church leadership. I picked it up thinking it might be worth checking out; loved it so much the rest of our Ministry Leadership Team got copies, and now we have a case of them on the way to give to our board of deacons and other leaders who are interested. It’s that good.

Basically, Thom Rainer set out to answer the question of how to become a welcoming church by interviewing people who visited churches one time and didn’t come back. He went after the reasons they didn’t return; what were the barriers to connecting? The result? This short little book (only 128 pages) packed with critically important observations for the church. Some of the things he pointed out were already on our radar to deal with; other things were areas we hadn’t even considered. Either way, it’s great having such a solid resource based on current research, to help inform decisions we make as a church in our pursuit of reaching this region.

It’s an easy read, packed with solid advice and insight, based on decades of church consulting and solid research, and a must read for those in church leadership. You can buy individual copies on Amazon, or get it in bulk on Thom Rainer’s website for a significant discount.

A Handful of Book Reviews …

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There are a number of books I’ve read in the last couple months; here are a few with brief summaries of my thoughts on them!

“Half the Church: Recapturing God’s Global Vision for Women,” by Carolyn Custis James. I thought this is a fascinating book; it was not what I expected. I really appreciated her comments on the different experiences for women around the world, challenging readers to recognize that while our fallen world often does not give women the respect and honor they deserve, the answers are not the same worldwide – that cultures and different environments demand different next steps. Ultimately, she challenges readers to capture God’s vision for women, to see the ways in which His will is not lived out and be a part of the answer to moving the world towards His intent. In our American culture, we are not yet a place as a country, or as a church, that can claim to be treating women like the image-bearers of God that they are. I definitely recommend this book.

“Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church,” by N.T. Wright. I really, really liked this book. I read it to explore Wright’s thoughts on heaven; that it is not a place we escape to, rather, it is a resurrected earth – part of our resurrection – a world finally fulfilling the vision God desires for it and His creation. What I didn’t expect was the incredible challenge to begin practicing for that resurrection life now; in how we live, how we treat others, how we care for the creation around us. Powerful, powerful stuff.

“Adam and the Genome: Reading Scripture After Genetic Science,” by Dennis Venema & Scot McKnight. I thought Venema and McKnight took an interesting approach; Venema, a scientist who is a believer, wrote the first half of the book focusing on what the latest research has told us about the human genome. McKnight wrote the second half of the book, taking a theologian’s approach to reconciling that information with faith. I was blown away by what has been learned from the genome; Venema is right when he asserts it points to a Creator – even if that evidence might challenge some of our traditional assumptions about origins. McKnight’s half of the book was good as well; I didn’t agree with all of his approaches, and honestly, I think John Walton has handled these topics more effectively in his “Lost World” books. Either way, it’s a fascinating book, and having been released in 2017, makes use of the latest research powerfully.

 

Cobra Kai

Geek blog post alert. You’ve been warned.

YouTube Red, the paid YouTube service launched the Cobra Kai tv series; ten episodes of pure awesomeness set 34 years after the original Karate Kid movie. Ralph Macchio (Daniel) and William Zabka (Johnny) are back and it is glorious.

I accidentally marathoned the whole thing over the space of a few days. Wasn’t the plan, couldn’t stop myself. It’s that good. I thought it would be cheesy, but they actually did a phenomenal job of hitting just the right tone. They brought a whole new level of depth and complication to both characters; they’re both right, they’re both wrong. It’s so good. And apparently the numbers are through the roof; it’s only been out a couple weeks and they’ve green-lit season two already. I’m just bummed I’ll have to wait a year.

If you have any affection for the original Karate Kid movie, this is worth checking out. The first two episodes are available for free; if you want to see the rest, you need a YouTube Red account – which has a free trial period. It’s good. I’ll be honest, I’m planning on watching them again …

I’m such a nerd.

Life, The Universe & Everything

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We just concluded a series a couple weeks ago in our Sunday morning high school group that I had a lot of fun putting together. Over the course of three weeks we tackled the question of faith and science. For me, there was a basic, underlying purpose to the series as a whole; we know that, depending on the survey, something like 60-80% of young people disappear from the church when they finish high school. We also know that the number one reason given for this is over the issue of science and faith; that for many young people, their church’s present it as an either/or scenario, that you can only choose one. And when they see compelling evidence for scientific claims that conflict with what their church’s taught them growing up, they feel like they don’t have a choice. My goal was to help reframe the question, to give students room to reconcile faith and science without dictating a ‘right’ answer.

I’m a nerd, so yes, I lifted the title, and the weekly titles, from ‘The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.” I also used Doctor Who and A Wrinkle in Time as well. More importantly, I drew on a LOT of theologians who have done far better work on this topic than I ever could to help shape the content. Here’s what the three weeks looked like (click the title to hear the audio):

  • The Ultimate Question: We kicked off the series by wrestling with the question of whether or not we are asking the right questions when it comes to faith and science. What is the ultimate purpose of scripture? Does our cultural values give us unexpected bias while we read these ancient documents?
  • Don’t Panic: We continued the series by taking a closer look at different theories of origins, ancient cultural values and beliefs, and Genesis 1. Is it possible to have different beliefs regarding origins and still honor God? How would the ancients have understood the first chapter of Genesis, and how should that inform our reading of it? Whatever you do, don’t panic!
  • Mostly Harmless: We concluded the series by comparing the creation narratives of humanity in Genesis 1 and 2. How do we explain the dramatically different order of creation found in these opening chapters of the Bible? In exploring how the ancients would have understood the Hebrew terminology used in both accounts, reconciling the two accounts is possible.

Anyway, it was a fun series to work on … and I’m hoping to continue to refine and adjust the content in the years to come.